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Monday, October 19, 2020 | History

2 edition of Predator avoidance, foraging behaviour and social transmission of information in fish shoals. found in the catalog.

Predator avoidance, foraging behaviour and social transmission of information in fish shoals.

Matthew Kenneth Litvak

Predator avoidance, foraging behaviour and social transmission of information in fish shoals.

by Matthew Kenneth Litvak

  • 351 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


The Physical Object
Pagination113 leaves
Number of Pages113
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15553543M

The predator sensitive foraging behaviour of free-living Verreaux’s sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi verreauxi) at Berenty Reserve, Madagascar by Jennifer Danielle Bernadette Prew B.A., University of Victoria, Supervisory Committee Dr. Lisa Gould, Supervisor (Department of Anthropology) Dr. Yin Lam, Departmental Member. Optimal Diet Theory suggests that individuals make foraging decisions that maximise net energy intake. Many studies provide qualitative support for this, but factors such as digestive constraints, learning, predation-risk and competition can influence foraging behaviour and lead to departures from quantitative predictions. We examined the effects of intraspecific competition within a .

  Additionally, experiments should be devised which could differentiate between foraging and predator avoidance; they both predict that a prey should move forward in the group. Other questions to be addressed include the influence of differences in size, parasite load, and defensive abilities on how individuals balance these fitness by: Collective animal behavior is a form of social behavior involving the coordinated behavior of large groups of similar animals as well as emergent properties of these groups. This can include the costs and benefits of group membership, the transfer of information across the group, the group decision-making process, and group locomotion and synchronization.

To assess whether behavioral differences in predator avoidance might be a causal mechanism increasing the success of the invasive amphipods, two exper­ iments were conducted examining (I) native and invasive amphipod behavioral responses to five fish species with different foraging behaviors, and (2). Some shoals engage in mobbing behaviour. For example, form large nesting colonies and sometimes attack snapping turtles. This may function to advertise their presence, drive the predator from the area, or aid in cultural transmission of predator recognition. Piranha have a reputation as fearless fish that hunt in ferocious packs. However %(1).


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Predator avoidance, foraging behaviour and social transmission of information in fish shoals by Matthew Kenneth Litvak Download PDF EPUB FB2

"The reason for this is the presence of many eyes searching for the food. Fish in shoals "share" information by monitoring each other's behaviour closely. Feeding behaviour in one fish quickly stimulates food-searching behaviour in others.

Fertile feeding grounds for forage fish are provided by ocean upwellings. Matthew Kenneth Litvak has written: 'Predator avoidance, foraging behaviour and social transmission of information in fish shoals' Asked in Mental Health, Anxiety Disorders, Emotions, How To.

Anti-predator adaptation in action: the seal shark Dalatias licha (a–c) and the wreckfish Polyprion americanus (d–f) attempt to prey on hagfishes. First, the predators approach their potential prey.

Predators bite or try to swallow the hagfishes, but the hagfishes have already projected jets of slime (arrows) into the predators' mouths. Ph.D. Zoology, University of Toronto, Thesis entitled "Predator Avoidance, Foraging Behaviour and Social Transmission of Information in Fish Shoals." Research interests Fish ecology, behaviour and ecophysiology.

The experiments investigated the effects of a school of live prey fish on the hunting behaviour of squid, cuttlefish and pike (ambush predators) and perch (a chasing predator).

The hunting. Matthew Kenneth Litvak has written: 'Predator avoidance, foraging behaviour and social transmission of information in fish shoals' Asked in Fish What fish eats fish that eats plaction.

Pruitt, J. et al. Behavioral hypervolumes of predator groups and predator–predator interactions shape prey survival rates and selection on prey behavior. Nat.– ().Cited by: In addition to reducing predation risk and increasing foraging efficiency (e.g.

Magurran & Pitcher, ; Ranta & Juvonen, ), fish shoals promote the transfer of social information. In situations where foraging sites vary both in food reward and predation risk, conventional optimal foraging models based on the criterion of maximizing net rate of energy intake commonly fail to predict patch choice by foragers.

Recently, an alternative model based on the simple rule “when foraging, minimize the ratio of mortality rate (u) to foraging rate (f)” was Cited by: Karen Kidd, Katharina Batchelar, in Fish Physiology, Inorganic Mercury.

There is growing evidence that a number of key behaviors – predator avoidance and reproductive, feeding, and social behaviors – are impaired at environmentally relevant exposures to contaminants such as Hg(II) (see review by Scott and Sloman, ).In addition, behavioral effects can be found.

However, the selective pressure to avoid predators and the resultant “nonlethal” effects of predation risk on individual foraging decisions are likely to play an important role in shaping a wide range of predator–prey communities, for example, avoidance by one prey type may force predators to select alternative prey or to alter their Cited by: Predator avoidance can also take the form of knowing when predators are active and choosing to be active at other times.

This is exemplified by the behavior of baby alligators (Alligator spp.), which when heavily preyed upon by African fish eagles (Haliatus vocifer) move from diurnal to nocturnal activity rhythms (Curio, ).

ACCORDING to the principle of natural selection, each individual animal is assumed to maximise its inclusive fitness1.

Thus, observed behaviour patterns should result from optimisation processes. Predator inspection behaviour and attack cone avoidance in a characin fish: the effects of predator diet and prey experience Shoals of predator-experienced versus predator-naı̈ve glowlight tetras were exposed to live Jack data suggest that both predator diet and prey experience play a significant role in the threat-sensitive mediation Cited by: Main KL () Predator avoidance in seagrass meadows: prey behavior, microhabitat selection, and cryptic coloration.

Ecology – Google Scholar Martin TH () The diets of bluegill and redear sunfish in Bays Mountain Lake. M.S. thesis, Cited by: Vigilance, in the field of behavioural ecology, refers to an animal's examination of its surroundings in order to heighten awareness of predator presence.

Vigilance is an important behaviour during foraging as animals must often venture away from the safety of shelter to find food.

However being vigilant comes at the expense of time spent feeding so there is a trade-off between the two. Fish intelligence is " the resultant of the process of acquiring, storing in memory, retrieving, combining, comparing, and using in new contexts information and conceptual skills" as it applies to fish.

According to Culum Brown from Macquarie University, "Fish are more intelligent than they many areas, such as memory, their cognitive powers match or exceed those of. "The reason for this is the presence of many eyes searching for the food.

Fish in shoals "share" information by monitoring each other’s behaviour closely. Feeding behaviour in one fish quickly stimulates food-searching behaviour in others. Fertile feeding grounds for forage fish are provided by ocean upwellings.

Here au is the energy intake from food and b(x,u) is the metabolic ations are based on the function b (x, u) = b 0 + (b 1 + b 2 x) u, where b 0, b 1 and b 2 are positive constants. Equation defines the mean change in reserves.

There is stochasticity about this mean, with actual reserves at time t+1 taking four possible integer Cited by: Group living provides the presence of social information within the group, allowing both male and female members to find and select potential mating partners. Alongside this, living in a group allows for higher reproductive success as individuals have access to a greater number of potential mates, and the possibility to choose between them.

PREDATOR‐AVOIDANCE BEHAVIOR EXTENDS TROPHIC CASCADES TO REFUGE HABITATS. Jonathan H. Grabowski. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Institute of Marine Sciences, Morehead City, North Carolina USA Toadfish significantly reduced mud crab foraging on clams and increased clam survivorship even though mud crabs foraging on the Cited by: LETTER Linking anti-predator behaviour to prey demography reveals limited risk effects of an actively hunting large carnivore Arthur D.

Middleton,1,2,10* Matthew J. Kauffman,2,3 Douglas E. McWhirter,4 Michael D. Jimenez,5 Rachel C. Cook,6 John G. Cook,6 Shannon E. Albeke,7 Hall Sawyer1,8 and P. J. White9 Abstract. Top of page Abstract. Many free-ranging predators have to make foraging decisions with little, if any, knowledge of present resource distribution and availability optimal search strategy they should use to maximize encounter rates with prey in heterogeneous natural environments remains a largely unresolved issue in ecology 1, 2, 3.Lévy walks 4 are Cited by: